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Vista 401(k) Plan

Glossary

Accumulation Period

The time during which a participant builds savings prior to retirement distributions.

Active Management

An investment strategy that seeks to outperform the average returns of the financial markets. Active managers rely on research, market forecasts, and their own judgment and experience in selecting securities to buy and sell.

Administrator

The organization which is responsible for qualified retirement plan management including the activities of record keeping and trustee. FBMC Benefits Management is the Vista 401(k) Plan administrator.

Alpha

Alpha is a risk (beta adjusted) measurement. Officially, alpha measures the difference between a portfolio’s actual returns and what it might be expected to deliver based on its level of risk.

Annuity

An annuity is a contractual financial product sold by financial institutions that is designed to accept and grow funds from an individual and then, upon annuitization, pay out a stream of payments to the individual at a later point in time. The period of time when an annuity is being funded and before payouts begin is referred to as the accumulation phase. Once payments commence, the contract is in the annuitization phase.

Asset Allocation

The apportioning of investment dollars among various asset classes, such as cash investments, bonds, and stocks. Also known as investment mix.

Back-End Load

A sales fee charged by some mutual funds when an investor sells fund shares. Also called a contingent deferred sales charge.

Balanced Fund

A mutual fund that seeks to provide some combination of growth, income, and conservation of capital by investing in a mix of stocks, bonds, and/or money market instruments.

Basis Point

A measure that equals one one-hundredth of one percent. For example, 30 basis points equal 0.30% or, as a decimal .0030.

Beta

A measure of the magnitude of a portfolio’s past share-price fluctuations in relation to the ups and downs of the overall market (or appropriate market index). The market (or index) is assigned a beta of 1.00, so a portfolio with a beta of 1.20 would have seen its share price rise or fall by 12% when the overall market rose or fell by 10%.

Bond

A debt security (IOU) issued by a corporation, government, or government agency in exchange for the money the bondholder lends it. In most instances, the issuer agrees to pay back the loan by a specific date and make regular interest payments until that date.

Bond Fund

A mutual fund that emphasizes income-consistent with risk, rather than growth-by investing in corporate, municipal, or U.S. government debt obligations, or some combination.

Closing Price

A mutual fund’s closing price, or net asset value (NAV), calculated at the end of each business day, set at 4:00 p.m. EST or EDT, based on the New York Stock Exchange closing. Also refers to the last trading price of a stock when the market closes.

Common Stock

A security representing ownership rights in a corporation.

Diversification

The strategy of investing in different asset classes and among the securities of many issuers in an attempt to spread overall investment risk.

Dollar-Cost Averaging

Investing equal amounts of money at regular intervals on an ongoing basis. This technique ensures that an investor buys fewer shares when prices are high and more shares when prices are low.

Dow Jones® Industrial Average (DJIA)

The oldest and most widely quoted of all market indicators, the “Dow” represents the average of 30 actively traded blue chip stocks on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE).

FBMC Benefits Management, Inc.

The Plan Administrator of the Vista 401(k) Plan.

Fixed-Income Funds

A mutual fund that seeks current income by investing in fixed-income securities such as bonds, sometimes referred to as a “fixed option”.

Front-End Load

A sales commission charged at the time of purchase by some mutual funds and other investment vehicles. Note: These charges have been waived for the funds in Vista 401(k) Plan.

Fund Family

A group of mutual funds sponsored by the same organization, often offering exchange privileges between funds and combined account statements for multiple funds

Growth and Income Fund

A mutual fund that seeks long-term growth of capital and current dividend income from stocks.

Growth Stock Fund

A mutual fund that emphasizes stocks of companies believed to offer above-average prospects for capital growth due to their strong earnings and revenue potential. Growth stocks tend to offer relatively low dividend yields, because these companies prefer to reinvest earnings in research and development.

Income Fund

A mutual fund that seeks current income rather than growth of capital. Income funds typically invest in bonds and/or high-yielding stocks.

Index Fund

A passively managed mutual fund that seeks to parallel the performance of a particular market index.

Indexing

A low cost investment strategy that seeks to match, rather than outperform, the return and risk characteristics of an index, by holding all securities that make up the index or a statistically representative sample of the index. Also known as passive management.

International Fund

A mutual fund that invests in securities traded in markets outside of the United States and/or stocks of companies domiciled outside the U.S. Foreign markets present additional risks, including currency fluctuation and political instability. In the past, these risks have made prices of foreign stocks more volatile than those of U.S. stocks.

Investment Advisor

The individual or firm contracted by the Administrator to provide a review of the funds in the portfolio and make recommendations to the plan sponsors.

Large-Capitalization ("Large-Cap") Fund

A mutual fund that invests in stocks of companies whose total market value, or market capitlalization, is typically more than $10 billion. Large-capitalization stocks tend to be issued by well-established corporations.

Management Fee

The amount a mutual fund pays to its investment adviser for the work of overseeing the fund’s holdings. Also called an advisory fee.

Manager (fund)

The person or persons responsible for the overall investment decisions of a mutual fund

Mid-Capitalization ("Mid-Cap") Fund

A mutual fund that invests in stocks of companies whose total market value, or market capitalization, is typically between $2 billion and $10 billion.

Money Market Fund

A mutual fund that seeks income, liquidity, and a stable share price by investing in very short-term investments. It usually has a stable share value of $1.00.

Morningstar

Morningstar, Inc. is a leading provider of independent investment research in North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia.

Mutual Fund

An investment company that pools the money of many shareholders and invests it in a variety of securities in an effort to achieve a specific objective over time.

Nasdaq (National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations)

A computerized system that provides price quotations for securities traded over-the-counter as well as for many securities listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

Net Asset Value (NAV)

The market value of a mutual fund’s total assets, minus liabilities, divided by the number of shares outstanding. The value of a single share is called its share value or share price.

No-Load Fund

A mutual fund that charges no sales commission or load.

Passive Management

See Indexing:  A low cost investment strategy that seeks to match, rather than outperform, the return and risk characteristics of an index, by holding all securities that make up the index or a statistically representative sample of the index. Also known as passive management.

Portfolio Diversification

The strategy of investing in different asset classes and among the securities of many issuers in an attempt to lower overall investment risk and to avoid the chance that a portfolio’s performance would be hurt by the poor performance of a single security, industry, or country.

Prospectus

A legal document that gives prospective investors information about an investment, including discussions of its investment objectives and policies, risks, costs, and past performance. A prospectus must be offered to a potential investor before he/she can establish an account and must also be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Qualified Domestic Relations Order (QDRO)

A judgment, decree, or order that gives a pension plan participant access to retirement assets that must be used to pay an ex-spouse or dependent children.

Qualified Retirement Plan

A retirement plan established by employers for their employees that meets the requirements of Internal Revenue Code Section 401(a) or 403(a) and is eligible for special tax considerations. The plan may provide for employer contributions, as in a pension or profit-sharing plan, as well as employee contributions. Employers can deduct plan contributions made on behalf of eligible employees on the business’s tax return as business expenses. Plan earnings are not taxed until withdrawn. Vista 401(k) is a qualified retirement plan.

Quotron

See Ticker Symbol: An abbreviation assigned to a security for trading purposes. A security’s ticker symbol is often used in newspapers and price-quotation services. Also called a trading symbol or stock symbol or Quotron symbol.

R-Squared

A measure of how much of a portfolio’s performance can be explained by the returns from the overall market (or a benchmark index). If a portfolio’s total return precisely matched that of the overall market or benchmark, its R-squared would be 1.00. If a portfolio’s return bore no relationship to the market’s returns, its R-squared would be 0.

Record Keeper

The organization that does the daily allocation of shares purchased through new contributions, transfers and/or reallocation of funds. Vista 401(k) subcontracts these services to AccuRecord.

Required Minimum Distribution (RMD)

The minimum amount that the IRS requires must be withdrawn each year from all tax-advantaged retirement plans starting in the calendar year following the year in which the plan holder reaches age 70-1/2 while the participant is no longer an active employee.

Risk

The potential to lose money (principal and any earnings) or the potential to not make money on an investment.

Risk-Adjusted Return

A measure of how much risk a fund assumed to earn its returns. Usually given as a number or a rating. The more return per unit of risk, the better.

Risk Tolerance

An investor’s ability or willingness to endure fluctuations, particularly declines, in the prices of investments while waiting for them to increase in value.

Rollover

Moving all or a portion of a tax-deferred retirement plan into an individual retirement account (IRA), 401(k), or other eligible plan. IRS rules, if followed, allow a rollover to be done without tax consequences.

Rollover IRA

A traditional individual retirement account holding money from a qualified plan or 403(b) plan. These assets, as long as they are not mixed with other contributions, can later be rolled over to another qualified plan or 403(b) plan. Also known as a conduit IRA.

S&P® 500 Index (Standard & Poor's® 500 Index)

An index of the 500 largest capitalized stocks in the United States that is widely recognized as a guide to the overall health of the U.S. stock market.

Securities and Exchange Commision

The agency of the federal government that regulates mutual funds, registered investment advisers, the stock and bond markets, and broker-dealers. The SEC was established by the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

Share

A unit of ownership in a mutual fund or a unit of equity ownership in a corporation, represented by a stock certificate naming the company and the shareholder.

Small-Capitalization ("Small-Cap") Fund

A mutual fund that invests in stock of companies whose total market value is typically below $2 billion dollars.

Social Security Benefits

Monthly government payments to retired workers or their families who have paid Social Security taxes for a total of 40 quarters or 10 years.

Stock

A security that represents part ownership, or equity, in a corporation. Each share of stock is a proportional stake in the corporation’s assets and profits, some of which could be paid out through dividends. Stock mutual funds are sometimes referred to as “variable” options.

Target Date Retirement Fund

A target-date fund is a mutual fund in the hybrid category that automatically resets the asset mix of stocks, bonds, and cash equivalents in its portfolio according to a selected time frame that is appropriate for a particular investor.

Ticker Symbol

An abbreviation assigned to a security for trading purposes. A security’s ticker symbol is often used in newspapers and price-quotation services. Also called a trading symbol or stock symbol or Quotron symbol.

Time Horizon

The amount of time, usually expressed in years, that an investor expects to hold an investment.

Total Return

A percentage change, over a specified period, in a mutual fund’s net asset value, with the ending net asset value adjusted to account for the reinvestment of all distributions of dividends and capital gains.

Trustee

The party named in a trust or plan who is authorized to hold the assets of the trust or plan for the benefit of the beneficiaries or participants. (Matrix Trust Company acts as the Vista 401(k) trustee.)

Value Stock Fund

A mutual fund that emphasizes stocks of companies whose growth opportunities are generally regarded as subpar by the market. Value stock companies often pay regular dividend income to shareholders and sell at relatively low prices in relation to their earnings or book value.

Volatility

The degree of fluctuation in the value of a security, mutual fund, or index, volatility is often expressed as a mathematical measure such as a standard deviation or beta. The greater a fund’s volatility, the wider the fluctuations between its high and low prices.

Wrap Fee

An overall management fee assessed from your retirement plan account for plan administration.

Accumulation Period

The time during which a participant builds savings prior to retirement distributions.

Active Management

An investment strategy that seeks to outperform the average returns of the financial markets. Active managers rely on research, market forecasts, and their own judgment and experience in selecting securities to buy and sell.

Administrator

The organization which is responsible for qualified retirement plan management including the activities of record keeping and trustee. FBMC Benefits Management is the Vista 401(k) Plan administrator.

Alpha

Alpha is a risk (beta adjusted) measurement. Officially, alpha measures the difference between a portfolio’s actual returns and what it might be expected to deliver based on its level of risk.

Annuity

An annuity is a contractual financial product sold by financial institutions that is designed to accept and grow funds from an individual and then, upon annuitization, pay out a stream of payments to the individual at a later point in time. The period of time when an annuity is being funded and before payouts begin is referred to as the accumulation phase. Once payments commence, the contract is in the annuitization phase.

Asset Allocation

The apportioning of investment dollars among various asset classes, such as cash investments, bonds, and stocks. Also known as investment mix.

Back-End Load

A sales fee charged by some mutual funds when an investor sells fund shares. Also called a contingent deferred sales charge.

Balanced Fund

A mutual fund that seeks to provide some combination of growth, income, and conservation of capital by investing in a mix of stocks, bonds, and/or money market instruments.

Basis Point

A measure that equals one one-hundredth of one percent. For example, 30 basis points equal 0.30% or, as a decimal .0030.

Beta

A measure of the magnitude of a portfolio’s past share-price fluctuations in relation to the ups and downs of the overall market (or appropriate market index). The market (or index) is assigned a beta of 1.00, so a portfolio with a beta of 1.20 would have seen its share price rise or fall by 12% when the overall market rose or fell by 10%.

Bond

A debt security (IOU) issued by a corporation, government, or government agency in exchange for the money the bondholder lends it. In most instances, the issuer agrees to pay back the loan by a specific date and make regular interest payments until that date.

Bond Fund

A mutual fund that emphasizes income-consistent with risk, rather than growth-by investing in corporate, municipal, or U.S. government debt obligations, or some combination.

Closing Price

A mutual fund’s closing price, or net asset value (NAV), calculated at the end of each business day, set at 4:00 p.m. EST or EDT, based on the New York Stock Exchange closing. Also refers to the last trading price of a stock when the market closes.

Common Stock

A security representing ownership rights in a corporation.

Diversification

The strategy of investing in different asset classes and among the securities of many issuers in an attempt to spread overall investment risk.

Dollar-Cost Averaging

Investing equal amounts of money at regular intervals on an ongoing basis. This technique ensures that an investor buys fewer shares when prices are high and more shares when prices are low.

Dow Jones® Industrial Average (DJIA)

The oldest and most widely quoted of all market indicators, the “Dow” represents the average of 30 actively traded blue chip stocks on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE).

FBMC Benefits Management, Inc.

The Plan Administrator of the Vista 401(k) Plan.

Fixed-Income Funds

A mutual fund that seeks current income by investing in fixed-income securities such as bonds, sometimes referred to as a “fixed option”.

Front-End Load

A sales commission charged at the time of purchase by some mutual funds and other investment vehicles. Note: These charges have been waived for the funds in Vista 401(k) Plan.

Fund Family

A group of mutual funds sponsored by the same organization, often offering exchange privileges between funds and combined account statements for multiple funds

Growth and Income Fund

A mutual fund that seeks long-term growth of capital and current dividend income from stocks.

Growth Stock Fund

A mutual fund that emphasizes stocks of companies believed to offer above-average prospects for capital growth due to their strong earnings and revenue potential. Growth stocks tend to offer relatively low dividend yields, because these companies prefer to reinvest earnings in research and development.

Income Fund

A mutual fund that seeks current income rather than growth of capital. Income funds typically invest in bonds and/or high-yielding stocks.

Index Fund

A passively managed mutual fund that seeks to parallel the performance of a particular market index.

Indexing

A low cost investment strategy that seeks to match, rather than outperform, the return and risk characteristics of an index, by holding all securities that make up the index or a statistically representative sample of the index. Also known as passive management.

International Fund

A mutual fund that invests in securities traded in markets outside of the United States and/or stocks of companies domiciled outside the U.S. Foreign markets present additional risks, including currency fluctuation and political instability. In the past, these risks have made prices of foreign stocks more volatile than those of U.S. stocks.

Investment Advisor

The individual or firm contracted by the Administrator to provide a review of the funds in the portfolio and make recommendations to the plan sponsors.

Large-Capitalization ("Large-Cap") Fund

A mutual fund that invests in stocks of companies whose total market value, or market capitlalization, is typically more than $10 billion. Large-capitalization stocks tend to be issued by well-established corporations.

Management Fee

The amount a mutual fund pays to its investment adviser for the work of overseeing the fund’s holdings. Also called an advisory fee.

Manager (fund)

The person or persons responsible for the overall investment decisions of a mutual fund

Mid-Capitalization ("Mid-Cap") Fund

A mutual fund that invests in stocks of companies whose total market value, or market capitalization, is typically between $2 billion and $10 billion.

Money Market Fund

A mutual fund that seeks income, liquidity, and a stable share price by investing in very short-term investments. It usually has a stable share value of $1.00.

Morningstar

Morningstar, Inc. is a leading provider of independent investment research in North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia.

Mutual Fund

An investment company that pools the money of many shareholders and invests it in a variety of securities in an effort to achieve a specific objective over time.

Nasdaq (National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations)

A computerized system that provides price quotations for securities traded over-the-counter as well as for many securities listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

Net Asset Value (NAV)

The market value of a mutual fund’s total assets, minus liabilities, divided by the number of shares outstanding. The value of a single share is called its share value or share price.

No-Load Fund

A mutual fund that charges no sales commission or load.

Passive Management

See Indexing:  A low cost investment strategy that seeks to match, rather than outperform, the return and risk characteristics of an index, by holding all securities that make up the index or a statistically representative sample of the index. Also known as passive management.

Portfolio Diversification

The strategy of investing in different asset classes and among the securities of many issuers in an attempt to lower overall investment risk and to avoid the chance that a portfolio’s performance would be hurt by the poor performance of a single security, industry, or country.

Prospectus

A legal document that gives prospective investors information about an investment, including discussions of its investment objectives and policies, risks, costs, and past performance. A prospectus must be offered to a potential investor before he/she can establish an account and must also be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Qualified Domestic Relations Order (QDRO)

A judgment, decree, or order that gives a pension plan participant access to retirement assets that must be used to pay an ex-spouse or dependent children.

Qualified Retirement Plan

A retirement plan established by employers for their employees that meets the requirements of Internal Revenue Code Section 401(a) or 403(a) and is eligible for special tax considerations. The plan may provide for employer contributions, as in a pension or profit-sharing plan, as well as employee contributions. Employers can deduct plan contributions made on behalf of eligible employees on the business’s tax return as business expenses. Plan earnings are not taxed until withdrawn. Vista 401(k) is a qualified retirement plan.

Quotron

See Ticker Symbol: An abbreviation assigned to a security for trading purposes. A security’s ticker symbol is often used in newspapers and price-quotation services. Also called a trading symbol or stock symbol or Quotron symbol.

R-Squared

A measure of how much of a portfolio’s performance can be explained by the returns from the overall market (or a benchmark index). If a portfolio’s total return precisely matched that of the overall market or benchmark, its R-squared would be 1.00. If a portfolio’s return bore no relationship to the market’s returns, its R-squared would be 0.

Record Keeper

The organization that does the daily allocation of shares purchased through new contributions, transfers and/or reallocation of funds. Vista 401(k) subcontracts these services to AccuRecord.

Required Minimum Distribution (RMD)

The minimum amount that the IRS requires must be withdrawn each year from all tax-advantaged retirement plans starting in the calendar year following the year in which the plan holder reaches age 70-1/2 while the participant is no longer an active employee.

Risk

The potential to lose money (principal and any earnings) or the potential to not make money on an investment.

Risk-Adjusted Return

A measure of how much risk a fund assumed to earn its returns. Usually given as a number or a rating. The more return per unit of risk, the better.

Risk Tolerance

An investor’s ability or willingness to endure fluctuations, particularly declines, in the prices of investments while waiting for them to increase in value.

Rollover

Moving all or a portion of a tax-deferred retirement plan into an individual retirement account (IRA), 401(k), or other eligible plan. IRS rules, if followed, allow a rollover to be done without tax consequences.

Rollover IRA

A traditional individual retirement account holding money from a qualified plan or 403(b) plan. These assets, as long as they are not mixed with other contributions, can later be rolled over to another qualified plan or 403(b) plan. Also known as a conduit IRA.

S&P® 500 Index (Standard & Poor's® 500 Index)

An index of the 500 largest capitalized stocks in the United States that is widely recognized as a guide to the overall health of the U.S. stock market.

Securities and Exchange Commision

The agency of the federal government that regulates mutual funds, registered investment advisers, the stock and bond markets, and broker-dealers. The SEC was established by the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

Share

A unit of ownership in a mutual fund or a unit of equity ownership in a corporation, represented by a stock certificate naming the company and the shareholder.

Small-Capitalization ("Small-Cap") Fund

A mutual fund that invests in stock of companies whose total market value is typically below $2 billion dollars.

Social Security Benefits

Monthly government payments to retired workers or their families who have paid Social Security taxes for a total of 40 quarters or 10 years.

Stock

A security that represents part ownership, or equity, in a corporation. Each share of stock is a proportional stake in the corporation’s assets and profits, some of which could be paid out through dividends. Stock mutual funds are sometimes referred to as “variable” options.

Target Date Retirement Fund

A target-date fund is a mutual fund in the hybrid category that automatically resets the asset mix of stocks, bonds, and cash equivalents in its portfolio according to a selected time frame that is appropriate for a particular investor.

Ticker Symbol

An abbreviation assigned to a security for trading purposes. A security’s ticker symbol is often used in newspapers and price-quotation services. Also called a trading symbol or stock symbol or Quotron symbol.

Time Horizon

The amount of time, usually expressed in years, that an investor expects to hold an investment.

Total Return

A percentage change, over a specified period, in a mutual fund’s net asset value, with the ending net asset value adjusted to account for the reinvestment of all distributions of dividends and capital gains.

Trustee

The party named in a trust or plan who is authorized to hold the assets of the trust or plan for the benefit of the beneficiaries or participants. (Matrix Trust Company acts as the Vista 401(k) trustee.)

Value Stock Fund

A mutual fund that emphasizes stocks of companies whose growth opportunities are generally regarded as subpar by the market. Value stock companies often pay regular dividend income to shareholders and sell at relatively low prices in relation to their earnings or book value.

Volatility

The degree of fluctuation in the value of a security, mutual fund, or index, volatility is often expressed as a mathematical measure such as a standard deviation or beta. The greater a fund’s volatility, the wider the fluctuations between its high and low prices.

Wrap Fee

An overall management fee assessed from your retirement plan account for plan administration.

P.O. Box 1878 Tallahassee, Florida 32302-1878

866-325-1278